James

The Internet Society advocates Encryption

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James    6

The Internet Society has lobbied the G20 to adopt a fully encrypted Internet, and advocates the use of strong encryption despite issues faced by law enforcement. CEO Kathryn Brown doesn’t hold back, and asks G20 nations to embrace encryption because the digital economy “will only continue to thrive and generate opportunities for citizens if the Internet is strong, secure, and trusted.”

“Strong encryption is an essential piece to the future of the world’s economy” is marked out in bold letters before going on to say “the Internet Society believes it should be the norm for all online transactions. It allows us to do our banking, conduct local and global business, run our power grids, operate, communications networks, and do almost everything else. Encryption is a technical building block for securing infrastructure, communications and information. It should be made stronger and universal, not weaker. However, rather than being recognized as the way to secure our online transactions or our conversations, all too often the debate focuses on the use of encryption as a way to thwart law enforcement. To undermine the positive role of encryption in the name of security could have devastating consequences.”

And to ensure the Internet Society’s viewpoint is clearly understood the article is rounded off with a 3-point manifesto…

If the G20 countries are serious about strengthening their economies and continuing to deliver economic and social prosperity to their citizens in future, there are three key principles they should endorse and implement immediately:

1. Encryption is an important technical foundation for trust in the digital economy and should be the norm. All users (whether government, business or individual) should use encryption to protect infrastructure, communications and the privacy and integrity of their data. Encryption technologies should be strengthened, not weakened.

2. The security of the digital economy is a shared responsibility that needs the expertise and experience of all stakeholders, across border and across disciplines. It is an urgent need that will require open, inclusive collaboration.

3. Users’ rights should be at the heart of any decisions related to the digital economy. They are both the customers and the contributors to the success of the digital economy.

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